A Recent Culinary Experiment: Curing Egg Yolks

Close up of cured egg yolks coated in kosher salt flakes on a bright blue plate

I recently experimented with curing egg yolks following the directions provided in the recipe for Asparagus with Cured Egg Yolk in the Le Creuset cookbook.

Close up of the cover of Le Creuset: A Collection of Recipes From Our French Table on a brown countertop

The Le Creuset directions for cured egg yolks call for 6 egg yolks, a mixture of sugar and kosher salt, and time.

Bette’s hand lowering an egg yolk into a round glass baking dish full of salt

Yolks were deposited carefully by hand into round indentations made with the back of a wooden spoon, sprinkled with salt mixture until just covered, then covered completely with a tightly fitting lid and refrigerated for 5 days until firm.

Close up of cured egg yolks coated in kosher salt flakes on a bright blue plate

Resulting yolks were indescribable but I will try my best: salty complex umami flavor when grated over bitter salad greens with a simple balsamic vinaigrette, luxuriously silk and rich when grated over warm buttered toast with avocado – some delicious sort of witchcraft takes place when grated over hot buttered noodles… forgive me, I’m drooling now.

Bette’s hand holding a clear 8oz jam jar to the light containing 6 cured egg yolks separated by small squares of parchment paper

Good for 30 days in the fridge which was the perfect amount of time for me to use the whole batch testing out various applications. I think for the right foodie recipient, a nicely labeled jar of cured egg yolks would make a fantastic holiday gift. Maybe with a microplane (aka a rasp grater, and FYI every kitchen needs one), a loaf fresh bread, and a wedge of good cheese?

You can tell what my priorities are (eating good food)!

Best, Bette