Easy Like Sunday Morning – Classic French Croissants and a New Book

I finally did it. I followed the recipe in Le Creuset Cookbook: A Collection of Recipes From Our French Table and made French Croissants from scratch.

Despite a brief period of cold, creeping self-doubt around the third touch and go, dicey repeat of “roll dough out into a 8″x12″ rectangle and fold into thirds like a business letter” I feel this bake went extremely well.

Croissants cooling on a parchment sheet lined wire rack

I started the dough on Friday afternoon which required overnight refrigeration. I worked the dough throughout the morning Saturday, alternating between rolling, folding, and chilling again and again. Next came cutting rolling, forming, then leaving to rise until doubled in size. Lastly this recipe called for brushing the top of each croissant with a wash of whole milk and egg yolk just before baking, resulting in the distinctively shiny, golden exterior classic croissants are known for.

I baked the croissants late Saturday afternoon and woke up this morning, Sunday, excited to make myself a small breakfast and tuck into a new book for a couple of hours.

Close up of a croissant torn in half showing its flaky internal layers

I’ve just started reading the book Real Life, a novel by Brandon Taylor which was a finalist for the 2020 Booker Prize and is so far bright, relatable, and poetically descriptive.

Pictured is a small table covered in white cotton cloth. In the middle of the table is a small, round orange plate. On the plate is a freshly baked croissant, a spoonful of cherry jam, a few slices of sharp cheddar cheese, and half an avocado with a fork resting in it. Also on the table surrounding the plate: half a banana, a lit candle in a brown tin, a mug of coffee that says “eliminate girl hate” in plain white letters inside a red heart, the book Real Life by Brandon Taylor, and a white hand-knit napkin featuring a cable knit leaf motif.

This is my ideal Sunday morning: bundled against the chill in a warm blanket, feet decked in colorful hand-knit wool socks, good candles burning, jazz records playing softly in the background, pecking at a tasty spread while reading a good book–unaffected by the snow falling gently outside.

I hope you are currently spending your Sunday nestled someplace equally cozy xx Bette

Recipe: Brown Butter, Toasted Almond and Chocolate Chip Skillet Cookie

Close up of a large, golden brown chocolate chip cookie in a cast iron skillet cooling on a stovetop

This skillet cookie is an adaptation of the Bon Appetit Giant Chocolate Chip Skillet Cookie recipe and combines a few of my favorite dessert elements: luxurious brown butter, sea salt, toasted almond and chocolate – with toffee-like crunchy cookie edges, and a delectably chewy cookie center. Think: chocolate chip cookies and your favorite fudgey brownies linked up to make a tasty, golden, nutty cookie baby…

A slice of skillet cookie on a bright yellow plate surrounded on a tea towel by a mug of coffee, a knitting project in progress, and a faded orange cloth napkin

My modifications on the original recipe linked above are as follows:

  • I gently browned the butter in a 9-10″ cast iron skillet, removed the skillet from the heat when butter golden brown and fragrant (approx. 5 mins over medium heat) and let the browned butter cool 10 minutes before combining with brown and white sugar in a large mixing bowl
  • Swapped 1.5 teaspoons vanilla for 1 teaspoon vanilla extract and 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • Swapped 50% of the all purpose flour for lightly toasted almond flour
Close up of a large golden brown chocolate chip cookie in a cast iron skillet

Brown Butter, Toasted Almond and Chocolate Chip Skillet Cookie Recipe

  • 1 cup chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 stick + 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 large egg, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup almond flour, toasted and cooled
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

Pre-heat oven to 375º

In a clean frying pan or skillet lightly dry-toast almond flour over low heat until fragrant. Set aside in a small bowl and allow to cool.

In a medium-sized bowl sift together flour, baking soda and sea salt. Stir in toasted almond flour and set aside.

In a separate large bowl, combine brown and white sugars. In a 9-10″ cast iron skillet, brown the butter until golden and fragrant, then promptly remove skillet from heat and allow to cool 10 minutes before adding to sugar mixture in large bowl and stirring until combined.

Add the room temperature egg, and vanilla and almond extracts to the large bowl and stir to combine.

Add dry ingredients to the large bowl and stir thoroughly until combined. Throughly fold in 2/3 cup of chocolate chips.

Spoon cookie dough into buttery, still-warm skillet. Press dough gently into an even layer that fills the bottom of the skillet, then sprinkle the remaining 1/3 cup of chocolate chips on top.

Bake for 18-20 mins until puffy and golden.

Remove skillet from the oven and allow cookie to cool completely in skillet for an hour.

Slice into 8 wedges and enjoy.

Bette xx

Hand-mending and an iced lemon loaf cake

This morning I began a massive mending feat: stitching two large Sashiko-inspired patches on to the knees of my well-loved, worn-nearly-into-the-ground Lucy and Yak organic cotton twill Dungarees.

Sashiko is the traditional Japanese method of decoratively mending or reinforcing textiles with cotton fabric and white or indigo-dyed thread. Sashiko is an expression of the traditional Japanese aesthetic Wabi-sabi, which is characterized by the appreciation of “imperfect beauty” and impermanence.

Faded black cotton pants slung across a coffee table with two large brown patches over the knees tacked down with several metal T-pins

I plan to sew each patch down by hand in a grid pattern of small stitches using linen thread in a few different natural tones that remind me of wildflowers… the resulting mend should reinforce the knees and lower legs for at least another year of abruptly kneeling in dirt to spot cool bugs, and scooting across the living room rug while “playing dogs” with… the dog. Don’t ask, I’m an adult and this is just how I live my life.

I’ve had this same pair of dungarees since the early days of Lucy and Yak, and I have worn them more times than I could possibly count. I envision them 10 years from now, held together entirely by clever little hand-stitches and assorted patches cut from long-since-retired-yester-clothes.

Close up of a freshly baked lemon loaf cake cooling on top of a piece of parchment paper on a wire rack

In current food news ‘round these parts: I baked a lemon loaf cake today using this recipe and it turned out great, really great. My only deviation from Maria’s recipe was that I opted for a quick vanilla bean icing to douse the top instead of the suggested lemon glaze. Smash hit. Well done on the recipe, Maria. 🙂

Close up of the cut end of the lemon loaf cake. The cake is moist and yellow inside with a golden brown edge, encased in a thin layer of vanilla icing

I’ll continue to share the process of mending the knees of my dungarees as I go.

What was the last piece of clothing you brought back to life with a thoughtful mend? I’d love to continue the discussion in the comments below.

All the best ~

Bette